Show simple item record

dc.creatorRuíz S., Óscar E.
dc.creatorLeiceaga Baltar, Xoán
dc.creatorRodrígez Pérez, Manuel
dc.creatorPrieto Villar, José
dc.date.available2016-11-18T22:53:19Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citation@inproceedings{2003_Ruiz_Geometric, title={Geometric Modeling In Design Of Naval Elements}, author={Ruiz, O. and Leiceaga, X. and Rodriguez, M. and Prieto, J.}, booktitle={International Conference on Tools and Methods Evolution In Engineering Design}, address={Napoli, Salerno}, year={2003}, }spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10784/9725
dc.descriptionBoundary Representations (B-Reps) of actual solid parts are correct from the geometrical and topological points of view -- However, when the solid to model has extreme slender ratios, the rigid rules of the B-Rep force a large number of finite elements required to model the solid interior of a closed shell (also called a 2-manifold without border) -- In the practice, modelling is then pursued by using only a partial shell (2-manifold with border), excluding the “interior” of it -- For the same reasons, other slender elements (trusses or beams) must be modelled as 1-dimensional wires (1-manifolds with border) -- Assumptions are made in both cases to replace the solid model information left aside -- The scenarios in which both 2-manifolds and 1-manifolds must coexist are undesirable from the mathematical point of view, since they render flawed topologies and geometries -- However, in the engineering domain, they are required, and enabled, by replacing the information lost in the modelling with additional kinematic and structural constraints -- These constraints force the 1-manifolds and 2-manifolds to intervene together in the numerical solution, therefore rendering realistic results, without actually coexisting in the geometric model -- These techniques are discussed here and applied to examples of shipbuilding industry, where slender forms and extremely large models are ubiquitousspa
dc.formatapplication/pdfeng
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Conference on Tools and Methods Evolution In Engineering Design, 2003spa
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccesseng
dc.subjectModelado geométricospa
dc.subjectFEA (Finite Element Analysis)spa
dc.titleGeometric modeling in design of naval elementsspa
dc.typeconferenceObjecteng
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjecteng
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersioneng
dc.rights.accessRightsclosedAccessspa
dc.subject.lembTOPOLOGÍAspa
dc.subject.lembCOLECTORES (INGENIERÍA)spa
dc.subject.lembVARIEDADES (MATEMÁTICAS)spa
dc.subject.lembDISEÑO CON AYUDA DE COMPUTADORspa
dc.subject.lembMÉTODO DE ELEMENTOS FINITOSspa
dc.subject.lembCONSTRUCCIÓN NAVALspa
dc.type.spaDocumento de conferenciaspa
dc.subject.keywordTopologyspa
dc.subject.keywordManifolds (Mathematics)spa
dc.subject.keywordComputer-aided Designspa
dc.subject.keywordFinite element methodspa
dc.subject.keywordShip-buildingspa
dc.rights.accesoAcceso cerradospa
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T22:53:19Z
dc.type.hasVersionpublishedVersionspa
dc.tipo.versionObra publicadaspa


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record