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dc.coverage.spatialMedellín de: Lat: 06 15 00 N degrees minutes Lat: 6.2500 decimal degrees Long: 075 36 00 W degrees minutes Long: -75.6000 decimal degreeseng
dc.date.available2016-02-09T00:25:29Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10784/7976
dc.description.abstractWe investigate why the economics literature often finds a negative relationship between increased schooling and GDP growth over short periods. We show that increases in GDP in 98 countries during five-year intervals are correlated with the increases in adults´ average schooling during the prior 40 years. We find that an additional year of schooling of the work force raised GDP by 7% on average during 1980-2005, but its initial effect on GDP was much smaller. The delayed effect of increased schooling on national productivity explains why recent increases in schooling cannot explain near-term increases in GDP.spa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherUniversidad EAFITspa
dc.titleEducation and Growth: Where All the Education Wentspa
dc.typeworkingPaperspa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.publisher.departmentEscuela de Economía y Finanzasspa
dc.type.localDocumento de trabajo de investigaciónspa
dc.subject.keywordEducationspa
dc.subject.keywordEconomic Growthspa
dc.subject.keywordMulti-countryspa
dc.subject.keywordHuman Capitalspa
dc.subject.keywordProduction Functionspa
dc.rights.localAcceso abiertospa
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T00:25:29Z
dc.type.hasVersiondraftspa
dc.identifier.jelO47
dc.identifier.jelI25
dc.contributor.authorBreton, Theodore R.
dc.contributor.authorSiegel Breton, Andrew


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